Competencies, SLOs, and Rubrics

Use the expandable menus below to review the Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) and Rubrics that have been approved for each MAC competency. As of summer 2020, the SLOs have been reviewed by the working groups and approved by the General Education Council. The Rubrics are still under development. Please check back frequently for updates.

Foundations courses connect students to the campus community by combining university transition content, information literacy, and transferable skills acquisition to facilitate academic and personal development.

Upon successful completion of this foundations course, students will:

  1. Develop academic skills in order to demonstrate the ability to identify and use campus services and resources (e.g. Library, Writing Center, Speaking Center).
  2. Develop goals and plans related to personal purpose, interests, or values between self and community.
  3. Build connections between self and community relationships with peers, faculty, and staff. (e.g., UNCG, college/student/department, special interest group, social/leadership/service initiative).
  4. Critically evaluate information and media sources in a variety of formats.
  5. Incorporate and cite sources accurately and correctly.

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Written Communication courses intensively focus on the teaching and learning of transferable writing strategies, including invention, arrangement, style, and revision.

Upon successful completion of this written communication course, students will:

  1. Analyze written texts to understand how they related to particular audiences, purposes, and contexts as a way to inform one's own writing.
  2. Create and revise written texts for particular audiences, purposes, and contexts.
  3. Through oral or written reflection demonstrate awareness of one's writing choices as wells as how one's own writing contributes to ongoing conversations.

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Oral Communication courses intensively focus on student development of oral communication knowledge and abilities, including presenting and interacting in contexts such as public speaking, interpersonal communication, and group communication.

Upon successful completion of this oral communication course, students will:

  1. Demonstrate appropriate and ethical oral communication messages for given contexts and communicators to increase knowledge, foster understanding, and/or promote change.
  2. Analyze and evaluate messages according to context, audience, intent, and other principles of oral communication, to contribute to the ongoing development of knowledge and relationship.

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Quantitative Reasoning courses prepare students to apply mathematical reasoning to formulate and solve problems from a variety of contexts and real-world situations.

Upon successful completion of this quantitative reasoning course, students will:

  1. Interrelate real-world information with mathematical forms (e.g., with functions, equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words, geometric figures).
  2. Formulate and justify conclusions based on quantitative arguments.
  3. Communicate the quantitative evidence of the argument.

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Courses in this competency intensely focus on health and wellness as well as information literacy. These courses provide explicit instruction in how to understand decisions as they impact the health and wellness of individuals or communities.

Upon successful completion of this health & wellness course, students will:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of factors that contribute to physical and/or mental health.
  2. Analyze the connection(s) of different aspects of wellness (i.e. choices or actions to achieve health/well-being) to the overall health of an individual or population.
  3. Synthesize information from multiple sources to support arguments and/or inform decisions.
  4. Integrate and cite sources accurately and correctly.

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Through these courses, students acquire a working knowledge of the foundational tools for reasoning, including constructing sound arguments, evaluating the quality of evidence, and forming judgments about the evidence, arguments, and conclusions of others in Humanities and Fine Arts disciplines.

Upon successful completion of this critical thinking and inquiry in the humanities and fine arts course, students will:

  1. Critically analyze claims, arguments, artifacts or information.
  2. Construct coherent, evidence-based arguments.

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These courses teach completion of a course in this competency, students should have a working knowledge of the foundational tools for reasoning, including constructing sound arguments, evaluating the quality of evidence, and forming judgments about the evidence, arguments, and conclusions of others.

Upon successful completion of this critical thinking and inquiry in the social & behavioral sciences course, students will:

  1. Critically analyze claims, arguments, artifacts or information.
  2. Construct coherent, evidence-based arguments.

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In the context of natural sciences, critical thinking means explaining, predicting, and reasoning about the behavior of natural systems, or the outcomes of observations or measurements, using arguments based on established scientific principles and models. In the context of natural sciences, inquiry means developing, deepening, refining, or extending concepts, principles, and models to explain natural systems, based on empirical observations.

Upon successful completion of this critical thinking and inquiry in the natural sciences course, students will:

  1. Critically analyze claims, arguments, artifacts or information.
  2. Construct coherent, evidence-based arguments.

Courses in this competency provide students with knowledge and critical understanding of similarities and differences across world cultures over time and emphasize the development of global perspectives and skills to engage cross-culturally.

Upon successful completion of this global engagement and intercultural learning through the humanities and fine arts OR through the social & behavioral sciences course, students will:

  1. Describe dynamic elements of different cultures. These elements may include (but are not limited to) aesthetic systems, communication systems, economics, physical environments, ethics, gender norms, geography, history, politics, religious principles, or social beliefs, norms and practices.
  2. Explain how similarities, differences, and connections among different groups of people or environmental systems affect one another over time and place.

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Courses designated in this competency will focus on systems of advantage and oppression, structures of power, and institutions while making connections to US or global societies and examining intellectual traditions that address systems of injustice. These courses will equip students with the intellectual skills and tools needed to connect both their positionalities and experiences as they reimagine their relationships with the world.

  1. Describe how political, social, or cultural systems and structures, in the past or present, have advantaged and oppressed different groups of people.
  2. Describe how political, social, or cultural systems, in the past or present, have produced and sustained ideas of difference and, in the face of that, how marginalized groups have meaningfully engaged in self-definition.
  3. Examine individual and collective responses for addressing practices of disenfranchisement, segregation, or exclusion.

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Courses in this competency foreground the role of quantitative data analysis and interpretation of empirical information in the development of scientific theories and models. Most courses meeting this requirement will include a laboratory section, so students can have adequate hands-on experience working with data in context.

Upon successful completion of this data analysis and interpretation in the natural sciences course, students will:

  1. Apply quantitative analysis to understand the natural world.
  2. Analyze and interpret quantitative data to evaluate and test hypotheses about the natural world.
  3. Construct and interpret data tables, charts, graphs, or other representations of scientific data.